Friday, April 7th @ 8PM

Erin Rae opens

Andrew Combs is a songwriter, guitarist, and singer who lives in Nashville. Originally from Dallas, Combs is inspired by the great tradition of Texas songwriting exemplified by Townes Van Zandt, Guy Clark, and Mickey Newbury.

Following the success of the 2010 EP Tennessee Time, Coin Records released the 7 inch single “Big Bad Love” in May 2012 and Combs” debut full-length album, Worried Man, on October 30, 2012.

Equal parts rough-and-ready Chicago blues, Planet Waves-era Dylan, and vintage Nashville folk, Combs’ live show has often been described as Merle Haggard’s stripped-down country rock meets the tightly wound garage punk of Detroit’s The MC5. In short, they call it “country soul swag,” and you should too.

Combs is also part of a Nashville renaissance in country-folk music that stems from the slicked-up rural country gems of Justin Townes Earle and the close-knit indie folk-rock of Caitlin Rose. Searching through this puzzle you might also find an answer to why Jack White operates a ’50s-inspired record shop and recording studio in Nashville and why the city has a buzzing punk scene. Maybe you’d even stumble into Combs and his band getting wild and fuzzy at a house party. Or maybe you’ll see Combs solo – on stage and alone as all hell – singing songs that have prompted middle-aged women to ask him, “Are you gonna be alright?”

Well, the Texas lad is just fine, thank you, and we think you’ll agree when you hear more of the sounds that are coming out of this East Nashville hotbed of dusty country soul, done up right.

Andrew Combs’ sophomore album, All These Dreams, marks a huge step forward for the Nashville singer-songwriter. Using his gifts for lyricism and wry observation, Combs weaves tales of love, sin and redemption, in a style that brings together classic country and contemporary pop. On this album, Combs continues to carve out his own singular path as an artist, reaching the heights of his Texas songwriting heroes.

Erin Rae

http://www.erinraemusic.com/

Growing up in Jackson, Tennessee, Erin Rae got an early introduction to folk music at home. Her mom and dad were both part-time musicians, playing their own brand of American roots music at churches, county fairs and coffee shops in west Tennessee. Starting as early as five years old, she would join them for a song or two.

Two decades later, she’s still spending her time onstage — this time as the main act. As the leader of Erin Rae and the Meanwhiles, she walks the line between old-school folk and modern Americana, creating a sound that nods to her influences while pushing ahead toward something new. It’s music that breathes, filled with pedal steel, vocal harmonies, acoustic guitar, bright bursts of melody and plenty of space. It’s also music that’s taken her halfway across the world, with Erin playing shows everywhere from Nashville (her adopted hometown) to Switzerland.

Erin and company recorded their full-length debut, Soon Enough, during an inspired two days in west Nashville. The group played live, tracking their parts together to capture the spirit of their concerts. There was no studio wizardry, no click track, no digital enhancement. Instead, the album — which Erin co-produced with Michael Rinne, Rodney Crowell’s touring bassist — serves as a gorgeous, no-frills Polaroid of Erin Rae and Meanwhiles’ sound, a sound they’ve been sharpening ever since the release of the Crazy Talk EP in 2010

During the five years that separate CrazyTalk from Soon Enough, a lot of life was lived. Erin’s songs tackle all of it: the changes, challenges and celebrations that come with a life dedicated to art. There are songs that deal with mental illness. Songs that deal with the importance of staying present. Songs inspired by childhood, adulthood and all the lovers and co-conspirators you meet in between.

The present wouldn’t be possible without the past. Released in September 2015, Soon Enough bridges the gap between the two, taking its inspiration from both places. This is new music for old souls.

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